Life: Yes, people DO want you to fail… Part 2

Back in June, I had mentioned some interactions with people in the past – people who, essentially, wanted me to fail. It’s unfortunate, but that’s just how some people are. You just have to accept that fact and deal with it.

Today, here’s a sequel. This can also be titled “Reason No. 3,252 Why I Don’t Like Teachers” – but the title above is fitting.

Anyway, here’s some background. This was some time ago. Knowing how passionate and dedicated I was in my classes, the director at the private college called me in for a meeting one afternoon.

She told me something along these lines: “Look, you’re amazing and you really care for our students – it’s obvious… I would like you to continue doing what you’re doing – but at the same time, I would like you to learn how to teach other courses so that you can be No. 2 behind [the principal, who’s also the No. 1 instructor in the school].”

The director mentioned that principal/No. 1 instructor – essentially the head teacher – by name, but for the purposes of this post I will not name any names, so that’s why I put that part in brackets.

Okay, I took her words to heart, and several days later I approached the principal/No. 1 instructor to inquire about one of the courses he was teaching. I explained the conversation I had with the director, and I expressed interest in knowing more about one particular course he was teaching.

His response? “Well, this reminds me of the time a former student thought that by watching eight hours of tennis, he was going to become a Wimbledon pro.”

All right – obviously, there was some lack of communication on the part of the director and the principal/No. 1 instructor. There was no professional development available at this college, but since the director told me, face to face, to learn how to teach additional courses – to be No. 2 behind the principal… who better to consult than the principal himself?

I mean, perhaps the two of them did not talk this over – but I wasn’t privy to the communications they had. That really was none of my business. I merely was trying to follow up because of what the director told me. I waited several days before approaching the principal. And hey, since his title was “principal,” you would think he would perform the responsibilities that came with that title?

Getting back to that conversation, I laughed it off and responded that he wasn’t really comparing me to a student he didn’t like, was he? I didn’t feel the analogy fit in that situation. I even offered to sit in and observe some of his classes if that might be better.

All he did was scoff and continue to be rude, refusing to take back his comment about the tennis-watching student. I mean, just another example of a fellow instructor not wanting to help out to make the college be more efficient.

…and an example of how people simply would rather you fail.

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7/06/18 Lesson

Morning Students:

After listening to today’s lesson and instructions, re-write these sentences.

1. Barry Bonds played for the Pittsburgh Pirates.
2. My fifth grade teacher is now retired.
3. Barack Obama usually presents eloquent speeches.
4. The Lincoln Memorial is located near the Washington Monument.
5. David is afraid of heights.
6. Your sister has beautiful hair.
7. Elvis Presley will be remembered for centuries to come.
8. Stephen King has written quite a few horror novels.
9. My neighbor Angel loves to plant her own vegetables.
10. Stevie Wonder is completely blind, isn’t he?

Video: The agony of trying to unsubscribe

Morning Students:

SPEECH CLASS: Here is another example of a speaker using effective methods to hold the audience’s attention. Listen & watch to this video, and then answer the questions you were given.

Here are today’s notes about the introduction and conclusion of a research essay – and also the proper way (and incorrect way) to quote from passages.

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Video: Emergency Room (Brian Regan)

Morning Students:

SPEECH CLASS: Watch the following video. As you are watching, make a note of the techniques he uses to keep your attention and make his “speech” funny.

Views from the Press Box at the Nat – Part 1

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The view from outside the press box as the sun was setting

Friday night, June 29th. The Canadians, after winning their last series against Tri-City, spanked the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes, 11-1, in the opener of a five-game set.

THE GAME: Yes, it was a rout, but the chatter in the press box early on was about LF Brandon Polizzi, the No. 9 hitter in the Vancouver lineup. A few of us were impressed with Polizzi, who started the game in left field before moving over to second base after two innings. Drafted by the Blue Jays in the 35th round in 2017, Polizzi has good speed – and is arguably the best base runner on the Canadians this season. If he’s not hitting .148 (coming into tonight’s action), he’s probably the leadoff hitter on the club.

Anyway, the exciting Polizzi thrilled the crowd on this night by smacking a run-scoring triple to right field to cap a three-run second inning, as the Canadians took the lead early and never looked back.

3B Bryan Lizardo, the regular third baseman playing first base on this night, was 4-for-4 with a double, three runs scored, and three RBI. Five games into the season, when the Canadians had their home opener at Nat Bailey, Lizardo was hitting just .071. Tonight’s four-hit game raised his average to .325.

RF Griffin Conine continues to impress. One of the highlights of the C’s offensively – there were plenty on a night the team scored 11 runs – was Conine’s two-run triple to right during a five-run sixth-inning outburst that put the game out of reach. The son of former major-leaguer Jeff Conine, Griffin had homered the day before in the 3-2 victory over Tri-City.

North Vancouver’s Will McAffer, meanwhile, has become this team’s “vulture.” Entering the game with two outs in the fifth in relief of starter Jordan Barrett, McAffer got out of a bases-loaded jam to preserve a 5-1 lead and then proceeded to work the next three innings to earn his third win of the season.

Barrett, the starter, didn’t throw harder than 90 mph, according to the radar gun. He did, however, have good location in the first four innings before seemingly tiring in the fifth and came one out short of a victory. Some in the press box were crowning Barrett “Cy Young” – until he couldn’t get out of the fifth inning, that is. Still, it was a good night for the left-hander drafted by the Blue Jays in the 18th round in 2017. He gave up just one hit with eight strikeouts – walking five.

The only player who struggled offensively was CF Hunter Steinmetz, who was making his Canadians debut. Called up from Bluefield (rookie ball) the day before, Steinmetz went 0-for-5 hitting out of the No. 2 spot in the lineup. The native of Jefferson City, MO, was selected by the Blue Jays in the 11th round of the 2018 draft out of Missouri State.

Overall, a great night for the home team, as the C’s banged out 16 hits – they outhit the Volcanoes 16-2 on the evening – to send Salem-Keizer, the league’s top team at 10-4 entering play, to the lopsided loss.

THE ANECDOTES: And oh, by the seventh inning, the game had dragged on so much that I desperately needed a Coke. I walked over to the fridge to grab a bottle – before Jordy, one of the media relations assistants, persuaded me to put it back. I needed that. It’s easy to give in to temptation – on a long night, sometimes I just have a craving for a pop. But I definitely needed the awesome Jordy to keep me in check. Yes, I placed the Coke bottle back into the fridge and stuck to water.

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OTHER SIGHTS: What can I say about the sunset? Well, a picture is worth a million words, so I’ll let the follow image do the talking…

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