My Books


KP has written both fiction and non-fiction.

DontBlametheKnuckleballerA huge baseball fan, KP wrote “Don’t Blame the Knuckleballer! Baseball Legends, Myths, and Stories” in 2015, a book that looks at more than 30 obscure and forgotten tales told by ballplayers, coaches, and broadcasters throughout baseball history – and repeated by historians and bloggers – while mixing in a knuckleballing theme. For each tale, KP asks, “Did this really happen?” or “Did they blame the right person?” Among the tales:

* Did Joe Niekro really strike out the first five batters of a game in the very first inning?

* Did Phil Niekro really make Floyd Robinson silly on a strikeout?

* Did “Sunday Teddy” Lyons really pitch only on Sundays?

* How did Tom Candiotti “botch” the Jeff Kent fantasy baseball story?

* Did Pedro Martinez actually forget the details of his first big-league start and blame the wrong guy?

* Did you know that Ted Williams had to face a knuckleballer on the next-to-last day of his historic 1941 season?

* Was Mark Grace really on deck when Glenallen Hill hit his mammoth home run at Wrigley?

This book can be purchased here.

end of jinx

In 2015, KP’s hockey book, “The End of the Montreal Jinx: Boston’s Short-Lived Glory in the Historic Bruins-Canadiens Rivalry (1988-1994),” looks at the oft-forgotten era of Boston Bruins hockey where the B’s finally triumphed over Montreal in playoff competition. This book can be purchased here.

The website for the Boston-Montreal book can be found here.

Tom Candiotti
In 2014, KP’s baseball book, “Tom Candiotti: A Life of Knuckleballs,” was published by McFarland and Company. The biography of the former major-league knuckleball pitcher can be purchased here.

The website for “Tom Candiotti: A Life of Knuckleballs” can be found here.

Fess up Jessup

“Fess Up, Jessup!” was published by Bucks County Publishing (PA) in 2010, a book which includes three short thriller stories penned by KP.

“Fess Up, Jessup!” can be purchased here. A review of this book can be found here.

Oh So Close
“Oh So Close, Canada! Lamenting Some of the Missed Championships in Canadian Sports History,” published on Lulu.com in 2009, looks at some of the missed championships by Canadian teams over the past 30 years. KP covers some hard-luck teams from that era, including the 1994 Montreal Expos, 2002 Toronto Maple Leafs, 2004 Calgary Flames, and the Calgary Stampeders of the 1990s. This book can be purchased here.

Other Books by KP Wee:

Don’t Blame the Knuckleballer II: More Baseball Legends, Myths, Stories, and Trivia” (2017)

IMG_3158In “Don’t Blame the Knuckleballer II,” KP looks at more than 20 additional obscure and forgotten tales told by ballplayers, coaches, and broadcasters throughout baseball history – and repeated by fans, historians, and bloggers – while mixing in a knuckleballing theme. For each tale, KP asks, “Now, wait a minute… Did this really happen?” This time, he also reminds us of some of baseball’s forgotten practitioners of the knuckler, and even offers a few trivia questions. This book can be purchased here.

The 1988 Dodgers: Reliving the Championship Season” (2018)

1988dodgersCan you believe that it’s been over 30 years since the 1988 Dodgers stunned the baseball world by defeating the powerful New York Mets and Oakland Athletics in the postseason to capture their fifth World Series championship in Los Angeles? It feels like it was just yesterday, doesn’t it? Gibson. Hershiser. Lasorda. Those were the big names, but not the only guys on that incredible ’88 Dodger team. Non-household guys like Leary, Howell, Hatcher, and general manager Fred Claire were some of the forgotten names on that championship ballclub, but they were, nonetheless, important pieces of the puzzle on that 1988 team. And now, 30 years later, Leary, Howell, Hatcher, Claire, and many other Dodgers on that team took the time to sit down and reflect back on that amazing season in the book “The 1988 Dodgers: Reliving the Championship Season.” So, if you’re a baseball fan who roots for the underdogs or you just love the Dodgers, you can relive that ‘88 championship season by picking up a copy of “The 1988 Dodgers: Reliving the Championship Season” today – and we’ll see you at the ballpark!

John Cangelosi: The Improbable Baseball Journey of the Undersized Kid from Nowhere to World Series Champion” (2019)

IMG_3111“John Cangelosi: The Improbable Baseball Journey of the Undersized Kid from Nowhere to World Series Champion” is a baseball biography published in 2019. If you’re looking for an inspirational baseball biography, look no further than the one on John Cangelosi, the former Major League Baseball outfielder who played for 10-plus seasons in the ’80s and ’90s. No, he wasn’t a superstar like a Mike Trout or a Cody Bellinger, but Cangelosi’s story is just as remarkable. Or perhaps even more. You see, the undersized Cangelosi wasn’t even supposed to make it to the pros. Listed as 5-foot-8, Cangelosi not only worked as hard as he could and made it to the big leagues, but he also stayed long enough to break a long-standing American League stolen-base record, frustrate some of the majors’ best pitchers and catchers, and, near the end of his career, win a World Series ring in his hometown. It’s a truly remarkable and inspirational story for young kids and for anybody who has a dream. Relive John’s inspirational and amazing career by picking up KP’s “John Cangelosi: The Improbable Baseball Journey of the Undersized Kid from Nowhere to World Series Champion” today!

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